fabioclass

TYPES OF FEEDING HABITS IN LIVING ORGANISMS


FEEDING HABITS

Different organism exhibits different types of feeding habits. These habits are FILTER FEEDING, FLUID FEEDING, PARASITIC FEEDING, SAPROPHYTIC FEEDING, FEEDING IN PROTOZOA, FEDDING IN MAMMALS, FEEDING IN HYDRA
In order to understand these terms one after the other, you have to read on patiently and if there is anything you seem not to understand, please feel free to use our comment box





1. ,h2>FILTER FEEDING
Filter feeders which are also called MICROPHAGOUS feeders feed on very tiny organisms which cannot be easily picked to the satisfaction of the feeder.
Filter feeders are mainly aquatic animals
and they have to wallow in water through sieve-like structure into their body in order to collect reasonable quantity of their prey or food.
Typical examples of Filter feeders are the mosquito larva, mussel, ducks and prawns


FILTER FEEDING IN MOSQUITO LARVA

The mouth of mosquito larva, for example has horny jaws and two small ciliated appendages or mouth brushes. These are used to create a current of water. The small colloidal particles or planktons, small plants and animals are filtered from water and ingested into the mouth as food


2.

FLUID FEEDING

Animals which feed on any fluid materials are classified as fluid feeders. And these examples are as follows
i. WALLOWERS: these organisms known as Wallowers rest within or wallow in their food, e.g. the tapeworm in the human intestine. The tapeworm lives within the digested food of its host and absorbs the food directly into its body and that because it has no elementary canal. The tapeworm uses its entire body to absorb already digested food of the host
ii. SUCKERS: suckers are organisms, mainly insects, which feeds by sucking fluids from the plants and animals. Typical examples of these group of organisms are bugs, mosquito, butterfly, tse-tse fly, aphid and housefly. Follow this link to read the full article the feeding mechanisms of holozoic organisms such as mosquito, house fly and butterfly






3.

PARASITIC FEEDING

Parasitic feeding is found both plant and animals. Examples of animal parasites are tapeworm, roundworm, liver fluke, louse, tick and guinea worm while plant parasites are Cassytha, dodder and mistletoe.
Parasites are structurally modified organisms that depends wholly or partially on other organisms for their food and survival
. The structural adaptation of tapeworm for example demonstrating parasitic feeding had been discussed in this post here PARASITIC NUTRITION.


4.

SAPROPHYTIC FEEDING

Saprophytes are mainly non-green plants which do not have or possess chloroplasts and therefore cannot manufacture their own food. So they feed on dead and decayed organic matter from which they derive their food. Typical examples of saprophytes are Rhizopus and mushroom, and mucor
The bodies of saprophytes are adapted in the following ways
i. They have hyphae instead of roots through which they pour out enzymes for digestion
ii. They are capable of carrying out extracellular digestion, i.e. digestion of food out the body cells of the plant.
iii. The digested food portion of the organic matter is later reabsorbed into the body




The following are related link and posts to this topic


1. Modes of nutrition in animals
2. Saprophytic nutrition
3. Parasitic nutrition
4. Forages and farm animal nutrition
5. Water as a food substance
6. Carnivorous nutrition in plants
7. Endoparasites and Ectoparasites feeding modes
8. Holozoic mode of nutrition
9. Heterotrophic mode of nutrition
10. Autotrophic nutrition
11. Chemosynthetic nutrition
12. Importance of balance diet
13. What is Kwashiokor?
14. How to test for food
15. Vitamin deficiency symptoms
16. Mineral deficiency symptoms
17. Types of carbohydrates
18. Food substances
19. Classification of food substances

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165. AGRICULTURAL MECHANIZATION
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