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LIFE CYCLE OF TICK AND HOW TO PREVENT IT FROM SPREADING FROM HOST TO ANOTHER


LIFE CYCLE OF TICK


Tick is an ecto-parasite of cattle, sheep, goat and dog.
Tick has been known in rare occasion to infect humans but the fact that humans don’t have much hairs where they can attach themselves.
There are different types of tick but for this article we shall be taking a look at tick in general and how they affect farm animals. The body of tick is divided into two: the head region and the abdomen. It has four pairs of tough, leathery integument.

The tick possesses a toothed hypostome

, which is a

piercing organ for sucking

the blood of the HOST.



LIFE CYCLE OF A TYPICAL TICK

The life cycle of most ticks occurs in four stages which includes egg, the larvae, the nymphs and the adult stages. Each stages of the development of the tick requires a separate HOST.
So how does these stages in the life the tick play out? So let’s take a look at the different stages of the tick in the following order
1.

EGG

After sucking blood from its HOST, a matured female tick drops down and lays her eggs in the ground under the grass and dies.
2.

LARVAE

The eggs hatches into a larvae with six legs. The larva crawls into the grasses from where it attaches itself to an animal passing by. The larva feeds on the blood of the HOST and then falls to the ground.
3.

NYMPHS

The larva now on the ground moults into a nymph with ei8ght legs. The nymph crawls and attaches itself to a second HOST. It feeds on this second HOST and falls to the ground again.
4.

ADULT TICK

The tick now on the ground moults in an adult tick, which crawls in the grasses and attach itself to a third HOST.
If the adult tick is a female, it inserts its mouth part into the skin of the HOST and sucks blood
But if the

adult tick

is a male, it does not fix itself to the skin but crawls on the skin in search of a female tick to mate with. After mating with the female tick it dies off.




When the female has sucked enough blood, it falls to the ground and lays its eggs and the whole process or cycle is repeated


WHAT ARE THE ECONOMIC IMPORTANCE OF TICKS OR EFFECTS OF TICKS

The following are the economic importance of tick
1. Ticks causes great annoyance and irritation to their HOST
2. ticks act as vectors of diseases, e.g. tick fever and heart water diseases
3. injuries from tick bites may become ulcerated wounds
4. wounds caused by tick may become source of secondary infections
5. damages on the skin by tick on the HOST reduces the quality of skin or hides
6. tick sucks the blood of the HOST thereby reducing the blood and causing anaemia in the HOST animal
7. the loss of blood in the HOST animal eventually lead weight loss and death of the animal;


HOW TO CONTROL THE SPREAD OF TICKS

1. keep animals in clean surroundings
2. regularly dipping of animals to destroy ticks or by spraying ASCARICIDE solution
3. practice rational grassing or PADDOCKING
4. isolation of new stock to ensure they are free from infection
5. change animal beddings regularly
6. hand-pick ticks from the body of the host animals






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2. Biology as an enquiry in science
3. Branches of biology
4. Processes of methods of science
5. Usefulness of science
6. Living and non-living things
7. Characteristics of living things
8. Differences between plants and animals
9. Organization of life
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18. Structures of plants and animal cells and functions of their components
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22. Plasmolysis
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25. Faccidity
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