How to Make money through snail farming


snail farming.

What is a snail? Where can it be found? Types of snail . Importance of snail. Become a millionaire through snail farming
Before you rush me into enlisting what you require to make it big time through snail farming, in agricultural science, bear with me a little and let me take you through memory lane what and how I dabble into snail farming. I remembered a few years ago in a town called Amai, not far away from Asaba the capital of Delta state, in Nigeria.This thing I'm talking about is around 1995 to 96. As children, we would go into the forest, infested with deadly wild animals to pick snails in the night, preferably midnight. As teenagers, a few of us were just involved just for the meat and while a whole lot of others were in for the money through the sales of this snails. They take them to the market for sales. A good example of this group is my younger brother, Ebigide George Chucks. You can check his profile here. Before I take you through snail farming processes, bear with me as I take through practical guide on how I became a success through snail farming. So let us take the first step which you should know first.
1.

What is a Snail?

Snails belongs a group of invertebrates called Mouse. They mostly have shell and no backbone while a few species of Snail don't have shell. Snails are land and water animal. All snail are not of the same size, and I can categorically tell you that there are more than 200 species, including land and water types. I know you are itching to know how to make a few million dollars doing snail farming, or your case is just to make a living through snail farming, don't worry, just hang on as I drill you through this practical guide.









YOU CAN ALSO CHECK OUT OTHER CAREER OPPORTUNITIES IN FARMING BY READING HERE So in this article I'm going to take you through how I became a success through snail farming. As long as there are different species of Snail, I am going to be concerned only about the giant African Land Snail called Archatina Snail, photo by George Fabian.... So where can we find this type of Snail? This type of Snail is majorly found in the rain forest belt of the West African coast.

It mostly lives in dampy areas, grasslands with a lot of thickets, ranging from the mangrove forest and river banks. In Nigeria, especially in the southern part, this type of is of two variety, the white shell and brownish type.

Note_if you are interested in snail farming to make a living but don't know to get it done, don't worry just contact me on my Google profile or Facebook pro Fabian George . You could be wondering who could be interested in eating Snail, but snail are one of the world's Now that you have known what you are going into, let's get started on how to become rich in one year of snail farming.

So here are a few things you will need to become a millionaire through snail farming.


1. A plot of land or more depending on availability.
2. Cocoa seeds or tubers in large quantities
3. Access to cassava peels
4. Large quantities of water-leave seed or seedlings
5. Large quantities of plantain suckers
6. Vibrated blocks in many quantity as you can afford So here we go*


First clear the land or site you want to use, do the stumping properly


Plant the coco-yam you have scattered across the site, please do not give much spaces per plant
Plant the water-leave in between the coco-yams


Plant the plantain at least 50 suckered per plot

Arrange the blocks in this form all over the site
..... The block arrangements should be made many because this is where the snails will laying their eggs. After planting, which in all fairness you should do during the raining season for effective result.

Please allow at least a month interval before introducing the snails thereof.


You don't need to buy feed or chemical as such it is a risk free investment. Your presence is always needed around the farm or better still look for nets and fence the place all around to prevent people from gaining direct access to the farm. You must make sure that the blocks are arranged in such away that the snails have a place to hide underneath or in-between during the day to avoid direct sun light.








The larger the farm and number of snail introduced the more your output. This method of snail farming is totally risk free.

Your extra feeds will be to look for cassava peels regularly and spread them across the farm.

Decayed organic wastes from homes can very useful as direct feeds. If the process is carefully followed you should begin to see returns within two to three months. If you have any questions about snail farming or something similar, please feel free to drop your comment below. If you find this article useful please share it with your friends and family. Good luck to you


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You can read some of most interesting topics below

HERE YOU WILL FIND EVERY AVAILABLE TOPICS ABOUT AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE AND BIOLOGY. AND THE LINKS TO THEIR VARIOUS SOURCES.
1. DEVELOPMENT OF AGRICULTURE
2. IMPORTANCE OF AGRICULTURE
3. SUBSISTENCE AGRICULTURE
4. COMMERCIAL AGRICULTURE
5. PROBLEM OF AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT
6. SOLUTIONS TO POOR AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT
7. AGRICULTURAL LAWS AND REFORMS
8. ROLES OF GOVERNMENT IN AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT
9. AGRICULTURAL POLICIES
10. PROGRAM PLANNING IN AGRICULTURE
34.
FORESTRY
35. WILDLIFE CONSERVATION
36. FACTORS AFFECTING LAND AVAILABILITY
37. TOPOGRAPHY
38. SOIL

113. CROP ROTATION
114. APPLICATION OF ORGANIC MANURES
115. FARM YARD MANURE
116. APPLICATION OF INORGANIC MANURE

117. LIMING






118. FARMING PRACTICES
119. BUSH BURNING
120. CLEARING

121. FERTILIZER APPLICATION
122. ORGANIC MANURING
123. FARM YARD MANURE

124. HUMUS
125. COMPOST
126. CROP ROTATION
133. FARM POWER AND MACHINERY
134. SOURCES OF FARM POWER
135. HUMAN SOURCE
149.
PLOUGHS
142.
FIELD MACHINES
157.
PLANTERS
164.
SIMPLE FARM TOOLS
165. AGRICULTURAL MECHANIZATION
166. THE CONCEPT OF MECHANIZATION

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farm cultivation systems


farming System Shifting Cultivation/Bush Fallowing

1. BUSH FOLLOWING
This is the practice of farming on a piece of land for some years then abandoning it for another piece of land.
It is mainly done under subsistence agriculture and in areas with abundant farmland. Under this practice, the farmer may not return to the same land in life.
At times, however, he may return after the land has been left fallow (that is, without cultivation) for several years.
The period of no cultivation is termed fallow period, hence this system is also called bosh fallowing.


Advantages
1. It helps to replenish the fertility of the soil in a natural way.

2. It prevents the rapid spread of crop pests-and diseases.

3. It helps to control soil erosion.

4. The system reduces farmers' cost of production in terms of erosion control practices and fertilizer usage.









Disadvantages

1. A lot of time and energy is usually spent by farmers in preparing fresh land for planting.

2. It leads to the destruction of valuable forest resources such as wildlife and timber trees.

3. It helps to control soil erosion.

4. The system reduces farmers cost of production in terms of erosion control practices and fertilizer usage.



2. LAND ROTATION

This is a modified system of shifting cultivation or bush fallowing.
The system involves dividing an available farmland into portions mostly practice as land tenure system. The farmer (then) farms on one portion for some time before moving to the next portion, in a definite order. This illustrated below:


Land Rotation The system is practiced in areas where farmlands are limited and where food crops are mainly grown.


Advantages

1 . it helps to main the fertility of the soil.

2. It also helps to reduce the build-up of pests and disease organisms.

3. It reduces soil erosion.


Disadvantages

1. The system does not encourage production of permanent crops such as cocoa

2. Diseases and pests can spread easily from old plot tn new .


3. PASTORAL FARMING

This system involves the rearing of animals that feed on forage crops (grasses and legumes), such as goats, sheep and cattle.
Pastoral farming could take any of these two forms:

(A)RANCHING:







This is a system of keeping animals in a fenced expanse of land containing forages (grasses and legumes) for them to feed on.
Examples are Obudu cattle ranch, in Cross River State, Igarra cattle ranch in Edo State.

(B) NOMADIC HERDING:

This involves the movement of grazing animals from one place to another in search of fresh pasture and ' water. This is mainly practiced by the Fulani nomads of northern Nigeria.

This system is also called pastoral nomadism or pastoral farming.

Advantages
i. It provides a source of animal protein.

ii. The system is not too costly because natural grasses are fed upon by the animals.

iii. Less labour is required as;one man can cater for a large number of animals.

Disadvantages

i. It is highly laborious for the herdsmen particularly the nomads.

ii. Animals can only be reared in grassland areas where they can have access to feed.

iii. The productivity of the animals is affected by availability of pasture crops. The latter is affected by seasonal changes.

4. MIXED FARMING

This is the combination of crop production with animal production on the same farmland. This is mainly practiced on commercial farms where large units of livestock such as poultry, pigs, etc. are kept along side the cultivation of crops like maize, rice, and vegetables.

Advantages

1. It ensures steady supply of income for the farmer.

2. It ensures against failure in one of the two enterprises (that is, crop production and animal production.

3. The farmer will be able to replenish the soil for crop cultivation using the manure from the animals.

4. The farmer can also supply feeds to the animals from the crop products.

5. The farmer and his family have access to good food obtained from both his crops and animals.

6. The animals may serve as source of power on the farm, e.g bullock can be used to pull ploughs or harrows.


Disadvantages

1. It requires a great deal of knowledge, skill, time and labour from the farmer.

2. When animals are reared on the same land where crops grown without fence, the animals may damage the crops.

3. It is expensive to operate - especially in respect of the skill personnel needed.

5. LEY FARMING

This system of farming is not so common in our communities except in experimental stations.
It involves alternating arable or production with the growing of forage crops on a piece of land, instance, a farmer may use a piece of land to grow food crops about two years and then use it for growing forage crops to animals for some other years. The land is re-ploughed and planted with food crops again.

The farm land is referred to as 'ley’ during the period it is covered with forages.
Advantages
1. The pastures, especially the legume species help to replenish the soil fertility.
2. Soil erosion is controlled through the system because at no point in time is the land exposed completely for too long a time
3. It also helps to reduce the build-up of pests and disease agents on a farmland.
It is not easy to practice, hence the system is not popular in most communities. 'flu1l forage crops usually become weeds on the farm when the farm is cropped with food crops and they are often difficult to triplicate.

6. TAUNGYA FARMING

This is the system whereby food crops are grown alongside trees.
It involves clearing forest land (forest reserve). and food crops. Later, tree seedlings are planted in between crops to continue on the land after the food crops have been harvested.

The system is practiced in forest reserves in the southern part of Nigeria where the State Governments allow the use of forest reserves arable farming.

Advantages

1. The fertility of the soil is usually high for crops to use for maximum productivity.

2. It is an economic way of replacing unwanted forest with desirable tree species.

3. The land is always protected against erosion.

4. The timber seedlings are protected by the food crops in their early stage of life.

5. The system provides a source of income to the government.








Disadvantages
1. It leads to destruction of natural forests which may result in the loss of many forest resources.

2. At times, the needed forests may not develop because most farmers do not cater for the forest trees as they are left to die under heavy cropping with cassava or plantains.

3. The system does not allow the cultivation of permanent crops such as cocoa, rubber, and oil palm.

don't forget to use the comment box and leave a message or suggestion and we will get back to you within seconds.

You can read some of most interesting topics below

HERE YOU WILL FIND EVERY AVAILABLE TOPICS ABOUT AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE AND BIOLOGY. AND THE LINKS TO THEIR VARIOUS SOURCES.
1. DEVELOPMENT OF AGRICULTURE
2. IMPORTANCE OF AGRICULTURE
3. SUBSISTENCE AGRICULTURE
4. COMMERCIAL AGRICULTURE
5. PROBLEM OF AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT
6. SOLUTIONS TO POOR AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT
7. AGRICULTURAL LAWS AND REFORMS
8. ROLES OF GOVERNMENT IN AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT
9. AGRICULTURAL POLICIES
10. PROGRAM PLANNING IN AGRICULTURE
34.
FORESTRY
35. WILDLIFE CONSERVATION
36. FACTORS AFFECTING LAND AVAILABILITY
37. TOPOGRAPHY
38. SOIL
39. BIOLOGICAL FACTORS

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IMPORTANCE OF CATTLE REARING




(a) Importance of Cattle
1. Beef, which is a rich source of protein, is obtained from cattle,
2. Milk is also a major product from dairy cows.
3. Hides are used for various industrial purposes, particularly leather works
4. It horns and hooves are used for making various household wares, e.g. knives, ash trays, etc.
5. Cattle production provides employment to many people directly or indirectly.
6. Povides income to the farmer.
7. The dungs serve as a good source of farm yard manure to crop growers.
8. The bones supply minerals such as calcium, phosphorus, sodium when included in animals feeds.

(b) Some Terms Associated with Cattle Production







1. Bull: an adult male cattle
2. Cow: adult female cattle.
3. Bullock or steet or Slag: a castrated male cattle.
4. Heifer: a young female cattle which has not had a calf, usually under I2 months old.
5. Yearling: a young cattle usually between 12 to 24 months.
6. Veal: the beef of young cattle.
7. Vealers: calves reared for veal production. They are usually slaughtered when 3 months old.
8. Colostrum: a kind of milk produced by a cow three to four days alter delivery.
9. Calving: the act of deliver in cows.
10. Servicing: mating of a cow by a bull.
11. Castration: removal of the male testes.
12. Heat period: the period when the cow is ready to receive the bull for servicing. It occurs mid-way within the oestrus cycle.
13. Oestrus cycle: the time interval between one heat period and another.
14. Gestation Period: This is the period of pregnancy. In cows it last lor 281-283 days i.e. about 9 months.
15. Udder: The breast of cows.

(c) Types of Cattle
There are different types of cattle depending on the purpose for which they are kept. These include:

1. Beef type cattle: Those kept for beef or meat production purposes, e.g. Ndama. Muturu. Keteku. etc.

2. Dairy cattle: Those kept for milk production purposes, e.g. white fulani. Buraji. etc.

3. Workcatde: These are cattle kept for work purposes. They arc used to do odd jobs in farms like
pulling of ploughs, e.g. Sokoto gudali. Kanrej. etc.

4. Dual purpose cattle: These are kept for more than one purpose. They could he kept for milk production and at the same time for beef production, e.g. Sokoto gudali.

(d) Breeds of cattle
The following are common breeds of cattle in Nigeria

(i) Humpless Cattle: Krui, Ndama, Muturu
(ii) Humped or Xebu Cattle: Red bororo. Sokoto gudali, Shuwa Cattle, white Fulani

(b) Foreign or exotic breeds: These can be grouped into two:
(i) Dairy breeds: e.g. Holstein Friesian. Brown Swiss. Red Den and New Jersey.
(ii) Beef breeds: e.g. Hereford. Aberdeen angus. Red devon. Etc.

(c) Management Systems in Cattle







Cattle can be managed under any of the following systems:

(i) Extensive System: This is the traditional method of cattle production. It is commonly practised in tropical countries of the this system, cattle are moved from one grazing land to the other depending on the availability of grass.

Most cattle in Nigeria are reared under this system. When become scarce in the dry season, the animals are moved Is where there is denser vegetation. The animals are In graze under the control of a herdsman.

don't forget to use the comment box and leave a message or suggestion and we will get back to you within seconds.

You can read some of most interesting topics below

HERE YOU WILL FIND EVERY AVAILABLE TOPICS ABOUT AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE AND BIOLOGY. AND THE LINKS TO THEIR VARIOUS SOURCES.
1. DEVELOPMENT OF AGRICULTURE
2. IMPORTANCE OF AGRICULTURE
3. SUBSISTENCE AGRICULTURE
4. COMMERCIAL AGRICULTURE
5. PROBLEM OF AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT
6. SOLUTIONS TO POOR AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT
7. AGRICULTURAL LAWS AND REFORMS
8. ROLES OF GOVERNMENT IN AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT
9. AGRICULTURAL POLICIES
10. PROGRAM PLANNING IN AGRICULTURE
34.
FORESTRY
35. WILDLIFE CONSERVATION
36. FACTORS AFFECTING LAND AVAILABILITY
37. TOPOGRAPHY
38. SOIL
39. BIOLOGICAL FACTORS
40. SOCIAL-ECONOMIC FACTORS
41. ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS AFFECTING AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION
42. CLIMATIC FACTORS AFFECTING AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION
43. TEMPERATURE
44. RAINFALL
45. WIND
46. SUNLIGHT
47. SOLAR RADIATION
48. BIOTIC FACTOR AND AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION
49. PESTS
50. BIRDS
51. DISEASES
52. SOIL MICRO-ORGANISMS
53. SOIL PH
54. ROCK FORMATION
55. IGNEOUS ROCK
56. SEDIMENTARY ROCKS
57. METAMORPHIC
58. SOIL AND ITS FORMATION
59. FACTORS OF SOIL FORMATION
60. LIVING ORGANISM
61. PARENT MATERIALS
62. SOIL FORMATION TOPOGRAPHY
63. PROCESS OF SOIL FORMATION
64. WEATHERING
65. PHYSICAL WEATHERING
66. CHEMICAL WEATHERING
67. PRESSURE
68. WATER
73. BIOLOGICAL WEATHERING
74. CHEMICAL AND BIOLOGICAL COMPOSITION OF THE SOIL
75. SOIL WATER
76. MICRO AND MACRO NUTRIENTS
77. SOIL MICRO ORGANISM
78. PROPERTIES OF SOIL
79. SOIL STRUCTURE
80. SANDY SOIL
81. CLAY SOIL
82. LOAMY SOIL

83. SOIL TEXTURE
84. IDENTIFICATION OF SOIL TYPES THROUGH EXPERIMENTS
85. RETENTION OF WATER BY VARIOUS SOIL TYPES
86. DETERMINATION OF SOIL PH REACTION
87. COLORIMETRIC DETERMINATION OF SOIL PH LEVEL
88. PH SOIL TEST
89. PLANT NUTRIENTS
90.
MACRO NUTRIENTS IN GENERAL
112.
THE MAINTENANCE OF SOIL FERTILITY
113. CROP ROTATION
114. APPLICATION OF ORGANIC MANURES
115. FARM YARD MANURE
116. APPLICATION OF INORGANIC MANURE

117. LIMING
118. FARMING PRACTICES
119. BUSH BURNING
120. CLEARING

121. FERTILIZER APPLICATION
122. ORGANIC MANURING
123. FARM YARD MANURE

124. HUMUS






125. COMPOST
126. CROP ROTATION
133. FARM POWER AND MACHINERY
134. SOURCES OF FARM POWER
135. HUMAN SOURCE
149.
PLOUGHS
142.
FIELD MACHINES
157.
PLANTERS
164.
SIMPLE FARM TOOLS
165. AGRICULTURAL MECHANIZATION
166. THE CONCEPT OF MECHANIZATION

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Thanks for sharing



EFFECT OF DISEASE DAMAGE TO CROPS rmoved



this blog you are looking for has been moved here
diseases of crops and their causes

don't forget to use the comment box and leave a message or suggestion and we will get back to you within seconds.

You can read some of most interesting topics below







HERE YOU WILL FIND EVERY AVAILABLE TOPICS ABOUT AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE AND BIOLOGY. AND THE LINKS TO THEIR VARIOUS SOURCES.
1. DEVELOPMENT OF AGRICULTURE
2. IMPORTANCE OF AGRICULTURE
3. SUBSISTENCE AGRICULTURE
4. COMMERCIAL AGRICULTURE
5. PROBLEM OF AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT
6. SOLUTIONS TO POOR AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT
7. AGRICULTURAL LAWS AND REFORMS
8. ROLES OF GOVERNMENT IN AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT
9. AGRICULTURAL POLICIES
10. PROGRAM PLANNING IN AGRICULTURE
34.
FORESTRY
35. WILDLIFE CONSERVATION
36. FACTORS AFFECTING LAND AVAILABILITY
37. TOPOGRAPHY
38. SOIL
39. BIOLOGICAL FACTORS
40. SOCIAL-ECONOMIC FACTORS
41. ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS AFFECTING AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION
42. CLIMATIC FACTORS AFFECTING AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION
43. TEMPERATURE
44. RAINFALL
45. WIND
46. SUNLIGHT
47. SOLAR RADIATION
48. BIOTIC FACTOR AND AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION
49. PESTS
50. BIRDS
51. DISEASES
52. SOIL MICRO-ORGANISMS
53. SOIL PH
54. ROCK FORMATION
55. IGNEOUS ROCK
56. SEDIMENTARY ROCKS
57. METAMORPHIC
58. SOIL AND ITS FORMATION
59. FACTORS OF SOIL FORMATION
60. LIVING ORGANISM
61. PARENT MATERIALS
62. SOIL FORMATION TOPOGRAPHY
63. PROCESS OF SOIL FORMATION
64. WEATHERING
65. PHYSICAL WEATHERING
66. CHEMICAL WEATHERING
67. PRESSURE
68. WATER
73. BIOLOGICAL WEATHERING
74. CHEMICAL AND BIOLOGICAL COMPOSITION OF THE SOIL
75. SOIL WATER
76. MICRO AND MACRO NUTRIENTS
77. SOIL MICRO ORGANISM
78. PROPERTIES OF SOIL
79. SOIL STRUCTURE
80. SANDY SOIL
81. CLAY SOIL
82. LOAMY SOIL

83. SOIL TEXTURE
84. IDENTIFICATION OF SOIL TYPES THROUGH EXPERIMENTS
85. RETENTION OF WATER BY VARIOUS SOIL TYPES
86. DETERMINATION OF SOIL PH REACTION
87. COLORIMETRIC DETERMINATION OF SOIL PH LEVEL
88. PH SOIL TEST
89. PLANT NUTRIENTS
90.
MACRO NUTRIENTS IN GENERAL
112.
THE MAINTENANCE OF SOIL FERTILITY
113. CROP ROTATION
114. APPLICATION OF ORGANIC MANURES
115. FARM YARD MANURE
116. APPLICATION OF INORGANIC MANURE

117. LIMING
118. FARMING PRACTICES
119. BUSH BURNING
120. CLEARING

121. FERTILIZER APPLICATION
122. ORGANIC MANURING
123. FARM YARD MANURE

124. HUMUS
125. COMPOST
126. CROP ROTATION
133. FARM POWER AND MACHINERY
134. SOURCES OF FARM POWER
135. HUMAN SOURCE
149.
PLOUGHS
142.
FIELD MACHINES
157.
PLANTERS
164.
SIMPLE FARM TOOLS
165. AGRICULTURAL MECHANIZATION
166. THE CONCEPT OF MECHANIZATION

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Thanks for sharing

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